Acts 17 Metaphysical Bible Interpretation

Metaphysical Bible Interpretation of Acts Chapter 17

Metaphysically Interpreting Acts 17:1-9

17:1Now when they had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where was a synagogue of the Jews: 17:2and Paul, as his custom was, went in unto them, and for three sabbath days reasoned with them from the Scriptures, 17:3opening and alleging that it behooved the Christ to suffer, and to rise again from the dead; and that this Jesus, whom, said he, I proclaim unto you, is the Christ. 17:4And some of them were persuaded, and consorted with Paul and Silas, and of the devout Greeks a great multitude, and of the chief women not a few. 17:5But the Jews, being moved with jealousy, took unto them certain vile fellows of the rabble, and gathering a crowd, set the city on an uproar; and assaulting the house of Jason, they sought to bring them forth to the people. 17:6And when they found them not, they dragged Jason and certain brethren before the rulers of the city, crying, These that have turned the world upside down are come hither also;17:7whom Jason hath received: and these all act contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus. 17:8And they troubled the multitude and the rulers of the city, when they heard these things. 17:9And when they had taken security from Jason and the rest, they let them go.
October 18, 1936: Acts 17:1

Through what stages does Truth pass in gaining entrance to man’s mind? The first stage is doubt. Then comes willingness to examine Truth. After this there rises a desire to experience Truth, which is followed by acceptance.

How are these various stages represented in the text of today's lesson? By the Gentile cities Amphipolis, Apollonia, and Thessalonica.

How does doubt affect the mind? As long as doubt is active, it closes the mind to Truth. At the same time it leaves man restless and unsatisfied, so that sooner or later he desires to investigate the causes of his doubt in order to resolve it.

May 14, 1944: Acts 17:1-4

What do we learn from Paul's methods of teaching on his missionary journeys? The fact that he always looked for a synagogue and taught the Jews first shows that spiritual truth gains by being taught in surroundings that are in harmony with it. His teaching the Jews first emphasizes our responsibility to enlighten that part of our mind which is busy with religious convictions and traditions.

Is an appeal to reason more compelling than an appeal to the emotions? Not in the beginning, but reason has the more lasting appeal in the ultimate. Unless a statement appeals to reason, it does not conform to Truth. In presenting Truth to his hearers Paul “reasoned ... from the scriptures.”

How is the Christ affirmed in this lesson? In the words of Paul, “this Jesus whom, said he, I proclaim unto you is the Christ,” The Christ is affirmed as incarnated in Jesus.

Why were the “devout Greeks” more easily convinced of the truth of Paul's preaching than the Jews? The Greeks represent the intellect. They were accustomed to engaging in logical arguments and disputations and took delight in matching their wits against an adversary. The Jews trusted more the traditions of the fathers in which their feelings were involved; therefore they were more difficult to reach and convince than the Greeks.

November 17, 1946: Acts 17:1-7

How has the thought of war or strife entered into our faith in a God of love? The dual nature of mankind is responsible for the place that the idea of struggle holds in the field of religious faith. The sense nature must be overcome before the spiritual can take possession of man. Instead of viewing the change from sense to spirit as a transformation brought about by a quickened spirit or consciousness in the soul, we have been taught by traditional religion that “the good fight of the faith” must be waged constantly, if we are to win through to spiritual consciousness.

In the contest between sense and spirit what part does the will play? An outstanding one. Paul (representing the illumined will) liked to meet opposition and argue from the Scriptures. He advised his listeners to put on “the whole armor of God.”

Can divine love be proved by argument? No, and it never will be. Argument arises out of disagreement, love out of oneness. The two are incompatible.

Aside from his habit of arguing and exhorting, what do we learn from Paul’s method of teaching on his missionary journeys? The fact that he always looked for a synagogue and taught the Jews first shows that spiritual truth gains by being taught in surroundings that are in harmony with it. His teaching the Jews first emphases our responsibility to enlighten that part of our mind which is busy with religious convictions and traditions.

How is the Christ affirmed in this lesson? As incarnated in Jesus. In the words of Paul, “this Jesus, whom, said he, I proclaim unto you, is the Christ.”

Why were the “devout Greeks” more easily convinced of the truth of Paul's teaching than the Jews? The Greeks represent the intellect. They were accustomed to engaging in logical argument and disputations and took delight in matching their wits with an adversary. The Jews trusted more the traditions of the fathers, in which their feelings were involved; therefore, they were more difficult to reach and convince than the Greeks.

Metaphysically Interpreting Acts 17:10-15

17:10And the brethren immediately sent away Paul and Silas by night unto Beroea: who when they were come thither went into the synagogue of the Jews. 17:11Now these were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of the mind, examining the Scriptures daily, whether these things were so.17:12Many of them therefore believed; also of the Greek women of honorable estate, and of men, not a few. 17:13But when the Jews of Thessalonica had knowledge that the word of God was proclaimed of Paul at Beroea also, they came thither likewise, stirring up and troubling the multitudes. 17:14And then immediately the brethren sent forth Paul to go as far as to the sea: and Silas and Timothy abode there still. 17:15But they that conducted Paul brought him as far as Athens: and receiving a commandment unto Silas and Timothy that they should come to him with all speed, they departed.
July 18, 1909: Acts 17:1-15

Lesson 3: PAUL'S SECOND MISSIONARY JOURNEY: THESSALONICA AND BEREA

Religious pioneers have to meet conditions in mind analogous to those in Nature. The wilderness gives way slowly to the onward march of civilization; new statements of Truth are resisted by the established religious thought, and the messengers find the way arduous. But those who have the pioneer spirit go steadily forward, moved by a force which they feel but do not always understand. Paul represents the true pioneer. He dearly loved to meet the opposition and discuss the proposition. His writings bristle with suggestions of war, and in one way or another he is constantly admonishing Christians to “put on the whole armor of God.” To him soul development was a war between the Spirit and the flesh. Yet he also knew the power of love, and Rev. Henry Drummond says that the greatest love poem of the world is the Thirteenth chapter of First Corinthians.

Discussing the laws of mind we can see why Paul and Silas stirred up so much contention. That subtle thought of war in Paul had its effect in this work. He argued, exhorted and contended, and the result was a reaction upon them of that sort of thought. It may be that certain fixed states of human thought have to be met that way and that the “fighting person” has his place among the pioneers of religion. In the early days of Ohio, Peter Cartwright was reviled by a bully, and greatly to his surprise, he was promptly whipped by the athletic minister, who rolled him in a mud hole until he begged to be let up. This episode became widely known and Peter Cartwright was duly respected thereafter by that crude element in every community that regards the minister as a sort of “weak sister.”

After the pioneer has done his work, then civilization sets in and new relations are established. Muscle and war give way to mind and peace. We live in a civilized age and our methods should be pacific. It is not for us to stir up opposition nor endorse the ways of those who do so. Therefore, instead of arguing the truth of the resurrection, we must demonstrate it. It is taught in the Scriptures and the logic of life anticipates it. That no one since Jesus has raised his body to the immortal plane is not a tenable argument against the possibility. Men have not yet fully demonstrated the use of the flying machine, yet they are working right up to the fulfillment of that long cherished dream of flying.

When the human body is purified, it will float in the air without a machine to bear it up. Jesus proved this: “As they were looking, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight.” Remember this was his flesh body, as he told Thomas, to whom he showed the print of the nails in his hands. And the record says, John 20:14, “This is now the third time that Jesus was manifested to the disciples, after that he was risen from the dead.”

- UNITY magazine.

October 18, 1931: Acts 17:5-11

Broadly speaking, what do all religious pioneers have to meet? Religious pioneers have to meet conditions in mind that are analogous to those in nature. Just as the wilderness gives way slowly to the onward march of civilization, so new statements of Truth are resisted by the established religious thought.

What does Paul represent? Paul represents the true pioneer. He dearly loved to meet opposition and to discuss Truth with his opposers.

What is the symbolical meaning of the work that Paul and Silas did among the Gentiles? The word “Gentile” is the Scriptural name for the thought realm that functions in and through the most material realm of consciousness. Paul and Silas represent thoughts of Truth in consciousness that are working to spiritualize material states of mind.

What was the special message carried by Paul to the Gentiles? Paul proclaimed and emphasized at every opportunity that Christ was the Son of God, that Jesus manifested the Christ, that He died and was resurrected from the dead, and that He is the Great Example for all men.

When this teaching is introduced into the mind, what are the results? The mind of the race has lost the consciousness of the superman, Jesus Christ, and is charged with thoughts of the reality of death. When one in spiritual illumination (as was Paul) teaches that Christ is the real of man, and that man, through functioning in the Christ consciousness, can heal and raise his body to immortal life, the old religious thoughts oppose and condemn the new concept of Jesus and His resurrection, as is symbolized by the experience of Paul and Silas.

What thoughts are most unreceptive to Truth? Established religious thoughts are found to be the most unreceptive. They are jealous of any disruption of established religious institutions.

How can the followers of Jesus Christ impress on both Jew and Gentile the truth of His resurrection and ascension? Instead of arguing to establish the truth of the resurrection, we must demonstrate this truth. Resurrection is taught in the Scriptures, and the logic of life anticipates it. That no one since Jesus has raised his body to the plane of immortality is not a tenable argument against the possibility of such a demonstration. When the human body is purified, it will be able to float in the air without a machine to bear it up. Jesus proved this: “As they were looking, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight” (Acts 1:9).

In the 11th verse we read that the Jews of Berea were more noble than those in Thessalonica. Explain. The keynote of this whole lesson is spiritual zeal. Thessalonica, a city of Macedonia from which Paul was driven, represents the burning or heated zeal evidenced by the soul that desires Truth, but that yet lacks tolerance and wisdom. Berea signifies the zeal of the soul in religious matters; zeal tempered by a certain good judgment, tolerance, and intelligent willingness to examine all thoughts presented to it, that the real Truth may be discerned and received into consciousness.

September 13, 1925: Acts 17:1-12

What is the symbolical meaning of the work that Paul and Silas did among the Gentiles? The word “Gentile” is the Scriptural name for the thought realm that functions in and through the most material realm of consciousness. Rome and Greece ruled the world in the time of Paul add Silas, and it was to the people or the thought activities of those countries that the word of Truth, carried by Paul and Silas, was given.

What was the special message carried by Paul to the Gentiles? Paul proclaimed and emphasized at every opportunity that Christ was the Son of God, that Jesus manifested the Christ, died, and was resurrected from the dead, and that he is the great example for all men.

When this teaching is introduced into the mentality, what are the results? The mentality of the race has lost the consciousness of the superman, Jesus Christ, and it is charged with thoughts of the reality of death. When one in spiritual illumination (as was Paul) teaches that Christ is the real of man and that man, by functioning in the Christ consciousness, may heal and raise his body to immortal life, the mentality of the old religious thoughts opposes and condemns the new concept of Jesus and his resurrection, as symbolized by the experience of Paul and Silas.

What thoughts are most unreceptive to Truth? Established religious thoughts are the most unreceptive. They are jealous of any disruption of established religious institutions. Paul found that a great multitude of devout Greeks, with their chief women, were converted, but the Jews, moved with jealousy, stirred up the rabble and set the city in an uproar, claiming that Jesus was a king coming to supersede Caesar.

How can the followers of Jesus impress upon both Jew and Gentile the truth of the resurrection and the ascension of Jesus? Instead of arguing to establish the truth of the resurrection, we must demonstrate this truth. Resurrection is taught in the scriptures, and the logic of life anticipates it. That no one since Jesus has raised his body to the plane of immortality is not a tenable argument against the possibility of such a demonstration. When the human body is purified, it will float in the air without a [flying] machine to bear it up. Jesus proved this: “As they were looking, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight.” Remember that he was living in his flesh body, as he told Thomas, to whom he showed the prints of the nails in his hands. John 21:14 says: “This is now the third time that Jesus was manifested to the disciples, after that he was risen from the dead.”

In verses 11 and 12 of our lesson, we read that the Jews of Berea were more noble than those of Thessalonica, in that they received the word readily, examined the Scriptures daily to see whether the things that Paul taught were true, and many of them believed. Explain. Thessalonica (built on the site of ancient Thermae, a name which meant “hot springs”), a Macedonian city from which Paul was driven by persecution of the Jews, represents the burning or heated zeal evidenced by the soul's desiring Truth, but lacking a sufficient mental balance to give tolerance and wisdom, Berea signifies the zeal that the soul exercises in religious matters, zeal tempered by good judgment.

October 18, 1936: Acts 17:5-11

What does Jason represent? Jason (“deliverer,” “healer”) represents the I AM in the first stages of its growth in the higher law. The I AM then conceals will and understanding (hides Paul and Silas) in the recesses of the conscious mind, instead of expressing them openly.

What is the secret place of the Most High? This expression denotes the spiritual consciousness that it is possible for us to enter, and in which we may learn to dwell permanently.

What does Caesar represent? Caesar represents the personal self, ruling man through reason and will.

In what way is Truth individualized in man and made practical? Truth is individualized through the medium of the I AM.

Should zeal, to be powerful, be altogether unaudited? To be most powerful zeal should be tempered by good judgment, tolerance, and intelligent willingness to examine all questions.

October 29, 1950: Acts 17:10-12

Why is the searching of the Scriptures commendable? Because the writers of the Scriptures were consecrated to the pursuit of Truth and to expressing it in as dear and concise terms as their understanding made them capable of doing. The truth that they discerned and recorded serves us as a guide, both to daily living and to discovering and assimilating further truth.

Is meditation an aid in the discernment of Truth? Yes. Meditation helps us to correlate our ideas concerning any given subject and thus to enlarge our understanding.

In our reading, what helps us to discern Truth? An earnest and sincere search for Truth on our part, together with singleness of purpose. The inhabitants of Berea examined “the scriptures daily, whether these things were so.” They were moved by a desire to find the truth of Paul's teaching. When we seek Truth earnestly and sincerely we find it.

Metaphysically Interpreting Acts 17:16-34

17:16Now while Paul waited for them at Athens, his spirit was provoked within him as he beheld the city full of idols. 17:17So he reasoned in the synagogue with Jews and the devout persons, and in the marketplace every day with them that met him. 17:18And certain also of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers encountered him. And some said, What would this babbler say? others, He seemeth to be a setter forth of strange gods: because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. 17:19And they took hold of him, and brought him unto the Areopagus, saying, May we know what this new teaching is, which is spoken by thee? 17:20For thou bringest certain strange things to our ears: we would know therefore what these things mean. 17:21(Now all the Athenians and the strangers sojourning there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing.) 17:22And Paul stood in the midst of the Areopagus, and said, Ye men of Athens, in all things, I perceive that ye are very religious. 17:23For as I passed along, and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription, TO AN UNKNOWN GOD. What therefore ye worship in ignorance, this I set forth unto you. 17:24The God that made the world and all things therein, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, dwelleth not in temples made with hands; 17:25neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, seeing he himself giveth to all life, and breath, and all things; 17:26and he made of one every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, having determined their appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation; 17:27that they should seek God, if haply they might feel after him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us: 17:28for in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain even of your own poets have said,
   For we are also his offspring.
17:29Being then the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and device of man. 17:30The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked; but now he commandeth men that they should all everywhere repent: 17:31inasmuch as he hath appointed a day in which he will judge the world in righteousness by the man whom he hath ordained; whereof he hath given assurance unto all men, in that he hath raised him from the dead. 17:32Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, We will hear thee concerning this yet again. 17:33Thus Paul went out from among them. 17:34But certain men clave unto him, and believed: among whom also was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and others with them.
September 11, 1921: Acts 17:16-31

What is the metaphysical meaning of Paul waiting at Athens? Paul waiting at Athens represents the spiritual will waiting for the opportunity to set into action the spiritual Word in the chief seat of intellectual learning, symbolized by “Athens.”

What do the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers represent? The Epicureans represent an aggregation of thoughts whose philosophy is that love of pleasure and enjoyment leads into abiding peace and health. The Stoic philosophers represent the direct opposite of the Epicureans. The Stoics believe that indifference in both pleasure and pain is the highest attainment of man.

What is the meaning of Areopagus? Areopagus means “court of justice,” or that place in consciousness where all the different aggregations of thought forces get a hearing, and (according to the light manifested in consciousness) a righteous judgment.

What is an idol? An idol is an object of worship.

Does one antagonize, when he works according to truth principles? No. In this instance, Paul, the spiritual will, in introducing himself, made it clear that he did not worship the idols of gold or silver or stone, but called Athenians' attention to their altar dedicated to “An Unknown God,” thereby avoiding all cause for offense. At the same time, he awakened in his listeners a desire to know something of the real God, which their idol typified.

What is the best evidence of the presence and power of Creative Mind? The manifest universe in its wonderful complexity and order. The God that made the world and all things therein.

How may one get a realization in Spirit of God’s presence and power? By contemplating God's mighty creative works, and by witnessing the constant actions of intelligence everywhere. Then by entering consciously into mental unity with that Presence.

What wonderful affirmation for spiritual realization is given in this text? “In him {God} we live, and move, and have our being.”

What other important truth is presented in this lesson? Another important truth presented in this lesson is that man is the offspring of God, that his body is a temple of God, and that to the degree in which we let God Mind manifest in us and through us, shall we be able to compare ourselves with Christ, the type man whom we must follow in our resurrection from the dead.

November 10, 1929: Acts 17:22-28

What is the meaning of “Areopagus”? Areopagus, or Mars' hill, was a rocky hill in Athens; on it the court of justice was held. Areopagus means “court of justice.” It symbolizes the place in consciousness where all kinds of thoughts are received and judged as to their truth.

What is the symbolical meaning of Paul's standing in the midst of the Areopagus and preaching to the men of Athens? Paul's preaching to the men of Athens represents the illumined word of Spirit projected by the will into the very midst of intellect's stronghold. Mars' hill (Areopagus) represents intellect's highest concept of justice.

Does the intellect have a correct concept of God? No. God is Spirit. The intellect conceives God to be a huge man; it imagines (images) him to have form and shape. Historical writers say that in the time of Paul there were in Athens between two and three thousand altars and images dedicated to the many gods that the Athenians worshiped. An old traveler tells us that there were more altars in Athens than in all the rest of the world. A Roman satirist said, “It is easier to find a god in Athens than to find a man.”

In his oration Paul said to the Athenians, “I found also an altar with this inscription, TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.” In intellectual consciousness what does this altar indicate? The dedication of an altar to the unknown God is an admission of ignorance, but it is often boasted of as indicative of tolerance and religious generosity. The broad-minded man with a devotional turn of mind points to his altar to the unknown God and says, “Although we know nothing about your omnipresent, spiritual God, this altar shows that we are not narrow; that we welcome all concepts of God.”

Sunday, December 13 1914: Acts 17:22-34

SILENT PRAYER: God is Spirit, and they that Worship him, must worship in Spirit and in Truth.

The Truth stands in the midst of Intellect's attempts at religious worship and commends them, yet proclaims their shortcomings. Bible scholars say that the word translated superstitious is misleading, that Paul was referring to the reverence which the Athenians paid to religious matters. Prof. Ramsey renders it, “More than others respectful of what is divine,” The intellectual concept of God is always relative. The Athenians were purely intellectual, and the more than three thousand images and statues of gods, demigods or heroes, which filled the city about this time, testified to the material concepts of their ideas of deity.

This is typical of the mind that is not enlightened as to the true character of God. Yet, notwithstanding all these concrete concepts of God, there is a yearning to know the unrevealed Spirit, and the mind is ever reaching out for a fuller realization of its source. This is the altar with the inscription, “To an Unknown God.” Paul did not call the Athenians ignorant. This also is a mistranslation. What he did say was, “Whom ye worship, not understanding his name, attributes and nature, him I set forth.” God is Spirit. Spirit is not form nor condition, but formless. The character of God as Absolute Being cannot be comprehended by the intellect. The Truth, therefore, makes a total denial of all beliefs about God of a temporal character. God does not require anything at our hands, being the source of all. Even personality is not recognized by the Divine Mind; he knows only unity and oneness in all men and all nations.

The mind of man cannot find God through any of the sense avenues, but one phase of his being may be perceived through “feeling after him,” that is, through the affectional nature, for “God is Love.” A splendid treatment for the realization of Omnipresence is this, “In him we live, and move, and have our being.” The One Life permeates every fiber of our organism; we move in it and it moves in us; our true being is involved in this One Essence and Cause of all.

When the Truth has been declared, and the intellect has received it, a new state of consciousness is set up. A “day,” or open state of the mind, has been established and there must be a change of thought, which is repentance. When we get the activity of the Truth going in our minds, the seed germ of our being, which is the Christ of God, is resurrected, and we have the assurance within us that this uplift is for all. The thoughts of the intellect do not all at once fall into fine with the Truth; some mock, some defer the acceptance to another time, but there are the elect few who form the nucleus of a strong church, which is a new state of consciousness where spiritual thoughts gather. – UNITY magazine.

October 4, 1925: Acts 17:22-34

What is the meaning of Areopagus? Areopagus means “court of justice.” It symbolizes the place in consciousness where all kinds of thoughts are received and judged and where a decisions is rendered as to their truth.

What does Paul's standing in the midst of the Areopagus and preaching to the men of Athens symbolize? Paul represents the illumined word projected by the will into the very midst of intellect's stronghold. Mars' hill (Areopagus) represents intellect's highest concept of justice.

Does the intellect have a correct concept of God? No. God is Spirit. Intellect conceives God as a huge man, and imagines (images) him in form and shape. Historical writers say that in the time of Paul there were in Athens between two and three thousand altars and images dedicated to the many gods that the Athenians worshiped. An old traveler tells us that there were more altars in Athens than in all the rest of the world. A Roman satirist said, “It is easier to find a god in Athens than to find a man.”

In his oration Paul said to the Athenians: “I found an altar with this inscription, To AN UNKNOWN GOD.” What does this altar in intellectual consciousness indicate? The dedication of an altar to the unknown God is an admission of ignorance, but it is often boasted of as indicative of tolerance and religious generosity. The broad-minded man with a devotional turn of mind points to his altar to the unknown God and says, “Although we know nothing about your omnipresent, spiritual God, this altar shows that we are not narrow; that we welcome all religious opinions.”

What is the difference between Paul’s concept of God and the concept of those who erect an altar to the unknown God? Paul represents the consciousness which understands the God of Spirit, which the intellect has stamped with the word “unknown.” It is spiritual understanding that boldly proclaims: “What therefore ye worship in ignorance, this I set forth unto you.”

Paul taught that Jesus Christ was the unknown God made manifest. What proof did he offer? Paul pointed to Jesus’ resurrection from the dead as the greatest assurance to all men of the truth that He was master over the great enemy of the human race, death. Fenar Fenton translates verse 31: “He has appointed a day in which He will judge the world with justice by a Man Whom He has provided, having given the strongest evidence by raising Him from among the dead.”

November 19, 1933: Acts 17:22-34

In individual consciousness, what does the city of Athens represent? It represents an intellectual center in man.

What is represented by Paul’s going to Athens and commending the Athenians for their attainments? Paul represents the power of the word active in consciousness. His going to Athens and commending the citizens for their achievements shows how the word of Truth (Paul) commends the attempts of the intellect to engage in worship.

Does the word of truth also call attention to the shortcomings of the intellect? Please explain. Yes. Intellectual ideas of Spirit are always relative, and lack understanding of the true character of God. But notwithstanding such imperfect intellectual conceptions of the Creator, there is always a deep yearning to know the unrevealed Spirit, and this leads to an eternal reaching out for a fuller realization of the one great source.

In our lesson today, how does Paul (representing the word of Truth) call attention to this particular point? He calls the attention of the Athenians to the altar they had dedicated to the “unknown” God, and proceeds to make it clear to them that good does not come from worshiping idols of gold and silver and stone, but from making conscious union with the very source of life. “He himself giveth to all life, and breath, and all things.”

What other point does the activity of the word of Truth make clear? That spiritual attainment is not for the select few, as those of high intellectual attainments usually feel, but for all people everywhere, is made clear by the word of Truth.

How does the word of Truth, represented by Paul, convert the thoughts of the intellect? The answer to this question is brought out in the 32d and 34th verses: “When they heard ... some mocked; but others said, We will hear thee concerning this yet again. ... But certain men clave unto him {Paul}, and believed.”

November 5, 1944: Acts 17:24-28

What is our chief duty to God? To learn the principles that underlie life and put them into effect in our life; to observe the laws of life, that affect us as individuals and as members of the race, and let the conception of our duty to others and of their rights as coequal with ours conform to the law.

Have any limits or qualifications been placed on the unity of all men by Divine Mind? Only on the duration of the various nations and the territories that they are to occupy. “He made of one every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, having determined their appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation.” The duration of a nation, under divine law, is determined by the degree of faithfulness with which its people keep the law of life and the law of love. Under divine law the bounds of their habitation are determined, not by aggression and violence, but by ethnical and climatic conditions.

September 23, 1951: Acts 17:24-28

INTERPRETATION

Where is the dwelling place of “God that made the world and all things therein”? Within us, where unenlightened men do not suspect His presence and never think to look for Him or His works. “In him we live, and move, and have our being,”

Why do we say “He” and “Him” of the indwelling God? God, Spirit, is impersonal, but becomes personal to us as we realize that He is our Father and we are His offspring. We then use the same words when speaking of God that we use when speaking of our earthly father.

Transcribed by Lloyd Kinder on 12-14-2013